Must Watch Wednesday: A Rockumentary directed by Dave Grohl

So I won't lie. I have a hard time resisting documentaries about music. I used to be slightly obsessed with Behind the Music on VH1. So when hubs clicked on Palladia the other night and saw that a rocumentary directed by Dave Grohl was starting, we were both in. And I'm so, so glad I watched this one. It was a fascinating peek into the music industry and the evolution of it told via the story of one famous recording studio. (And it also has a lot of relevance to the book industry regarding the huge shift digital caused, not just in putting out the music but in producing it.)

Plus, if for nothing else, I just love watching artists be passionate about what they do. 

SOUND CITY is currently playing on the Palladia channel and I believe it's also free on Amazon Prime Streaming, so go forth and watch. : )

Here's the trailer:

 

Has anyone else seen this one? Any rockumentary recommendations?

The Joe Manganiello Growl & Magic Mike to Brighten Your Day

This week I am in the middle of doing major edits on Grant's book, so I am in the writer's cave. However, to keep you occupied on Boyfriend of the Week day, I thought I'd give you a bit of Joe Manganiello growl and some Magic Mike loveliness.

And hottest thing about this video is not the growl. It's the the fact that he thanks Charlaine Harris, the WRITER, in the first part of his acceptance speech. It drives me crazy at movie/TV awards when someone wins with a movie that was based on a book and thanks everybody from casting to craft services, and the author is never mentioned. So annoying.

Enjoy...

 

And Sunday, I finally got the chance to see Magic Mike. My self-sacrificing husband actually went along with me. He gets lots of brownie points for taking me. Good man. Here's a little snippet if you haven't seen it (or even if you have and want to watch again.)

 

Hope you enjoy your Tuesday! And send good editing thoughts my way, I'm in the need of an epiphany that is going to fix everything by next Monday.

Memorable Love Scenes: Titanic

Poster via IMDB.comWe've been talking about memorable love scenes this week. And today I'm taking one that uses the "glossed over" sex scene to perfection. There are times you don't have to show everything (in a movie or in a book) but the scene cna still be sensual and impactful.

This scene stands out in my mind because of the emotion (we know what's about to happen to that ship) and the conflict (Jack and Rose come from different worlds but can't stay away from each other.) In almost all circumstances, there needs to be overlying conflict within your love scenes--why is it so dangerous for these two to be together. (Unless it's the happily ever after scene or a setup scene like the one in Ghost yesterday.)

 

 

 

Here's the scene:

 

So what are your thoughts on this one? Is it the tension that's been set up (remember the painting scene)? Is it the emotion? Or is the stakes and conflict?

Memorable Love Scenes: Ghost

Poster via IMDB.comThis week we're analyzing memorable love scenes so that we can hopefully write books that have scenes just as memorable. We've talked about setting and having the scene change the character. Today, I'm featuring one that not only has uniqueness going for it with the pottery wheel AND Patrick Swayze (king of the memorable love scene), but is chock full of emotion. 

This scene is actually a bit of the movie's setup or "showing the ordinary world" before the inciting incident, but it also packs a lot of emotion because the moviegoer knows what's going to happen to Patrick. They've seen the preview, they know what the title of the movie is. So this scene taps into that deep emotion of being with the person you love most in the world.

 

 

 

Here's the scene:

So what do you think? Why does this one stand out in so many of our memories?

Memorable Love Scenes: Pretty Woman

Poster via IMDB.comIf you missed it yesterday, this week I'm featuring memorable love scenes so that we can a) enjoy and b) analyze what makes the scene so memorable so that we can translate it into our own writing. Yesterday, we looked at the unique setting factor.

Today, I wanted to feature a scene that has one of the most mundane settings of all--a hotel room--but it still a classic memorable moment. It focuses on the change in the characters. A love scene, whether it's a kiss or a full sex scene, should always change the characters in some way. Otherwise, why are you showing it?

So here's the kissing scene from Pretty Woman:

This scene is definitely smexy--I mean, it's Richard Gere and Julia Roberts, come on now. But the reason it has stuck with so many of us is because of what that kiss represented. Sex wasn't a big deal for Vivian, but a kiss...that was a whole different thing.

So what do you love most about this scene? Why do you think it's so memorable?

Memorable Love Scenes: Risky Business

 

Movie poster via IMDB.com

This week I'm taking a bit of a break from the normal blogging schedule. I've just wrapped up teaching an online class on writing love scenes. And one of the things I asked students to do was name love scenes from movies or books that stood out in their memory. The point of the exercise was to look at those scenes and see WHY they were memorable. What did the storyteller do to make them so impression-making?

So this week, I'm going to post some of the examples we used so that you can break them down too. (Or if you're not a writer, just sit back and enjoy the smexiness.)

First on the agenda is Risky Business and the smoking hot scene on the train. (This doesn't have nudity but isn't exactly safe for work either.) This is an example of using a unique setting to your advantage.

 

 

 

 

 

Hot, right? So why is this scene memorable? Is it simply the location, the chance of someone discovering them? Is it the tension built up before this? Or is it because the moment is tranformative for the characters? Or is it just because it's a young Tom Cruise and Rebecca DeMornay?